All Politics is Local

Get ready for more political candidates opposed to I-1639

In this upcoming election, Battle Ground voters will have the chance to vote for two city council candidates who’ve made opposition to a recently enacted statewide gun control initiative a campaign issue. Next election cycle, the entire state will have the chance to vote on a candidate who’s also seeking to undo the law. 

As reported earlier this week by Ammoland.com, Republic Police Chief Loren Culp has indicated that he will run for governor next year as a Republican. Last November, the small-town police chief drew attention after stating that he would instruct his police officers to not enforce Initiative 1639, a gun control initiative passed by Washington voters earlier that month. 

Democratic Gov. Jay Inslee (currently running for president) hasn’t indicated if he’ll seek reelection next year, and Culp likened his bid to Ammoland.com as a “David-versus-Goliath” situation. 

On his website, Culp outlines his stance on other issues on addiction and mental health, taxes, veterans and others. He doesn’t specifically state what he’ll do about I-1639, but accuses the governor and attorney general of violating their oaths of office by supporting laws that violate citizens’ rights. He also pledges to protect people’s rights if elected:

It is this principle that guided Loren’s actions to say “No” to i1639. If we would have had police that stood by this principle to do what is right and protect citizen’s rights, as Loren did, Rosa Parks would not have been taken to jail and millions of Jews would not have been sent to their deaths. 

Culp has begun visiting other parts of the state and was in Clark County in May to give a speech at the Clark County Republican Party’s annual Lincoln Day dinner, where he was warmly received. 

In the meantime, Shauna Walters and Josh VanGelder, two opponents of I-1639, will be on the Aug. 6 ballot for Battle Ground City Council. The response to Culp’s candidacy on North County Sons and Daughters of Liberty, a local Facebook group set up in opposition to I-1639, was enthusiastic.